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New York 2   Subways   Amusement Parks   Rockefeller Center

Bloomingdale’s       Macy’s

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Most of these buildings are easily recognizable and are worthy of a visit anytime you go to New York. There are just too many great old buildings and things to see at one time, so you will also want to visit New York 2, as well as Rockefeller Center, New York Subways and New York Amusement Parks.

Grand Central Terminal at Park Avenue and 42nd Street, which was recently refurbished, was built between 1903 and 1913. A 13-foot clock adorns the entrance. Perched precariously above the clock are Mercury, Hercules and Minerva. The main lobby ceiling is 10 stories high.

The Statue of Liberty was built in 1886 and it was a gift from the people of France to the United States. It is 12 stories high and there are 168 steps to the crown.

The Empire State Building (left), at 5th Avenue and 34th Street opened in 1931 on the site of the original Waldorf Hotel. It is nearly a quarter of a mile high at 1,250 feet (It is 1472 feet to the top of the television transmitter).

The Chrysler Building (right), at Lexington and 42nd Street was built in 1930. It has 77 floors and it is 1,045 feet high. At the time it was built, it was the tallest building and it was flat on top. In the race to be the tallest building, the art deco crown was added at a later date.

When the Empire State Building was built, the original Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, (left), was torn down. The current Waldorf-Astoria, (right), which has 47 stories and 1850 rooms, opened in 1931. It was known as “America’s unofficial palace”.

The New York Stock Exchange

The more things change, the more they stay the same. Traffic jams were common nearly a century ago.

An early view of a bustling Times Square

Here is an early picture of Herald Square. Macys Department Store is to the left.

New York’s elevated curve at 110th Street is long gone, but you can still ride the subways.

In New York Album 2, you will see some things that tourists don’t always get to see in just one visit.

New York 2

New York Subways

Bloomingdale’s

Coney Island

Rockefeller Center

Last updated 12-06-08

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