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"For the benefit and enjoyment of the people"

Yellowstone Park was discovered in December 1807 by Mountain Man John Colter. The 3400-square mile park was designated America’s first “National Park” on March 1, 1872 when President Ulysses S. Grant signed the Yellowstone National Park Bill. It was “Set Aside for All the People”.

N.R. Langford was appointed the first Park Superintendent. He received no pay or salary and no funds were designated for operation of the Park. Poachers and Renegade Indians proved to be a problem and the U.S. Army was called in to restore order. In 1917, the newly formed National Park Service took control.

Northern Entrance Arch at Gardiner, Montana.

President Teddy Roosevelt visited Yellowstone frequently and he was one of the Park’s biggest promoters. He dedicated the Northern Entrance Arch in 1902. Roosevelt Lodge at Tower Falls was one of his favorite spots.

Old Faithful spews up over 10,000 gallons of very hot water to a height of 150 feet or more about once an hour.

Yellowstone Park was famous for its Natural Wonders. Among the more popular ones were: Old Faithful, the Petrified Forest which contained petrified birds in petrified trees, the Obsidian Cliff, the Fishing Cone and Yellowstone Canyon.

Northern Pacific Depot at the Gardner Entrance.

Union Pacific Station – Western Entrance.

Lake Hotel at Yellowstone.

Entrance to Lake Lodge at Yellowstone.

Originally Old Faithful Inn served as a train station for the Northern Pacific Railway.

A profile view of Old Faithful Inn by the geyser.

 Geyser Water Swimming Pool at Old Faithful.

In the early days before trains, cars and busses, visitors to Yellowstone Park rode on stagecoaches like this one.

Automobiles were first allowed into Yellowstone Park in 1915 and busses replaced the stagecoaches. The roads were very primitive and travel was quite slow and adventurous.

To get from Portland to Yellowstone, you could take Great Northern's Oriental Limited through the Cascade Tunnel, or you could take Union Pacific as the following ad from 1923 suggests.

Last updated 10-28-16

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